Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, and Michigan will be the leaders in electric vehicle battery manufacturing

Jan. 11, 2023
The U.S. Department of Energy stated that an increase in planned electric vehicle battery manufacturing facilities will allow North America to produce 998 GWh/year by 2030.

In a recent release, the U.S. Department of Energy stated that an increase in planned electric vehicle battery manufacturing facilities will allow North America to produce 998 GWh/year by 2030. According to the Department, this will allow approximately 10 to 13 million electric vehicles to be produced each year. When broken down by state, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, and Michigan have the greatest number of planned projects. This data is based on a report from Argonne National Laboratory called "Assessment of Light-Duty Plug-in Electric Vehicles in the United States, 2010 – 2021"

In an excerpt from the report, the authors state that, "Over 2.1 million plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs)have been sold in the United States through December 2021, with 1.3 million of these all fully-electric battery electric vehicles (BEV), and 800,000 plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) which have the capability of using gasoline. The sales-weighted average range for BEVs reached 290 miles in 2021 and 28 miles for PHEVs. We estimate that electric vehicles have driven 68 billion miles on electricity since 2010, thereby reducing national gasoline consumption by 0.54% in 2021 and 2.5 billion gallons cumulatively through 2021. In 2021, PEVs used 6.1 terawatt-hours of electricity to drive 19.1 billion miles, offsetting 700 million gallons of gasoline. We find that this fuel switching reduced consumer fuel costs by $1.3 billion in 2021. Since 2010, 65% of PEVs sold in the United States have been assembled domestically, and over 110 gigawatt-hours of lithium-ion batteries have been installed in vehicles to date. "