Protect against overpressure: Know your PRVs

Understand the appropriate use of different pressure relief devices

By Amin Almasi for Chemical Processing

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Many processes require a device to control or limit the pressure that can build up due to an upset, instrument or equipment failure, or fire. Pressure relief valves (PRV) most commonly provide this protection against overpressure but backflow preventers (such as check valves and others) and rupture disks also play useful roles in many applications. In addition, special classes of relief valves, usually known as vacuum relief valves, safeguard against excessive vacuum. Such devices actuate when pressure (or vacuum) exceeds a specified design value.

A conventional PRV is a self-actuated spring-loaded valve that opens at a designated pressure to allow the pressurized fluid to exit. (Some small valves commonly handle thermal relief valve applications.) The basic elements of a spring-loaded PRV include an inlet nozzle connected to the vessel or system to be protected, a movable disk that regulates flow through the nozzle, and a spring that controls the position of the disk.

Read the full story on chemicalprocessing.com.

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