General Monitors' PA4000 Gas Monitor features a photoacoustic, infrared sensor

General Monitors' PA4000 Gas Monitor is designed with a photoacoustic, infrared (IR) sensor to monitor a variety of gases including hydrocarbons, solvents, alcohols, CO2, CO and other gases.

The PA4000 Gas Monitor is designed to eliminate cross-sensitivity to water vapor. It features a proprietary sensing technique that determines the amount of water vapor in the sample and subtracts it from the gas reading.

With a range of 0-1000 ppm depending on the specific configuration, the PA4000 Gas Monitor is accurate to ± 2 ppm at 0-100 ppm and ± 10% of reading from 100-1000 ppm. The PA4000 features sensitivity of 2 ppm and resolution of 1 ppm, with specifications for other ranges dependent on application. For certain gases, it detects concentrations as low as 0.01 ppm.

The PA4000 Gas Monitor indicates gas concentrations and alarms. The direct reading display shows the actual gas value, as well as any current alarms and diagnostic messages.

The PA4000 Gas Monitor operates over a temperature range of 32° F to +122° F (0° C to +50° C) and has a storage temperature range of -67° F to +158° F (-55° C to +70° C). It has a temperature effect of ±0.3% per degree (°C) of reading and operates at a humidity range of 0-95% relative humidity, non-condensing.

The PA4000 Gas Monitor can be configured to monitor from up to eight remote areas, with standard features including a vacuum fluorescent display, audio alarm and four relays. The unit can be housed in general-purpose, explosion-proof or rack-mount enclosures. It also offers standard 4-20 mA and 0-10 V outputs. The multipoint sequencer option allows expansion of the PA4000 to monitor up to eight locations with the display indicating the monitored location with its corresponding gas concentration.

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