OMG's RhinoBond System eliminates roof fluttering by evenly distributing the wind load

As wide TPO and PVC membranes become more prevalent in the industry, rooftop fluttering has become a greater concern among contractors and building owners alike. The RhinoBond System from OMG offers a non-penetrating mechanical fastening solution that virtually eliminates this issue by evenly distributing the wind load across the roof.

RhinoBond is an alternative insulation and membrane attachment system that uses the same fastener and plate to secure the membrane and the insulation without penetrating the roofing material. The system does not create any potential point of entry for moisture, requires fewer fasteners and provides improved wind-uplift performance.

At the core of the RhinoBond System is an electromagnetic induction welder that bonds the underside of the membrane to a specially coated plate that then holds the insulation and membrane in place.

Since the fastening points are spread across the entire roof in a grid pattern rather than concentrated on the edge of the membrane, the wind load is distributed more evenly. As a result, there is less point loading, allowing higher wind ratings with fewer fasteners.

In addition to requiring 25% to 50% fewer fasteners when compared to traditional fastening methods, the RhinoBond System does not require perimeter half-sheets, so fewer seams are needed on the roof.

The system has achieved an FM 1-210 wind uplift rating, and in static testing, resists over 500 pounds of force. RhinoBond plates are available for TPO and PVC membranes, packaged in pails of 500 and can be installed using several different OMG fasteners. 

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