Women at greater risk of losing jobs to automation

By Jeff Green for Bloomberg

Jan 23, 2018

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Women are more likely than men to be knocked out of their U.S. jobs by automation in the next eight years, and they’ll find half as many opportunities to land new positions unless there’s a new effort to retrain them.

Those conclusions, from a study released Monday at the World Economic Forum, show about 57 percent of the 1.4 million U.S. jobs to be disrupted by technology between now and 2026 are held by women. With proper retraining, most of the workers would find new, higher-paying jobs. Without it, very few have opportunities, but women fare the worst, according to the study, conducted in collaboration with the Boston Consulting Group.

One positive for women: under the retraining scenario, women’s wages would increase 74 percent while men’s income would rise 53 percent, having a potential for narrowing the pay gap.

To learn more, read "Women Face Greater Robot Risk for Job Losses, Davos Report Finds" from Bloomberg.

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