How windmills as wide as jumbo jets are making clean energy mainstream

By The New York Times

Apr 23, 2018

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At the northern end of Denmark’s Jutland peninsula, the wind blows so hard that rows of trees grow in one direction, like gnarled flags.

After energy prices spiked during the 1973 oil crisis, entrepreneurs began building small turbines to sell here. “It started out as an interest in providing power for my parents’ farm,” said Henrik Stiesdal, who designed and built early prototypes with a blacksmith partner.

Now, the biggest turbines in Osterild stretch more than 600 feet high. The largest rotor blades can reach 270 feet in length, comparable to the wingspan of an Airbus A380. The monstrous scale has helped turn wind into a mainstream form of power.

Read the full story at nytimes.com.

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