In the U.S., factory jobs are high-tech, but workers are not

By the Associated Press

Aug 22, 2017

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In a state-of-the-art Ohio laboratory in a World War II-era building the size of 27 football fields, GE Aviation workers use breakthrough technology to build jet engines that run on less fuel at higher temperatures. Bright flashes flare out as GE workers run tests with a robotic arm that can withstand 2,000 degrees (1,090 Celsius).

The open jobs there are among 30,000 manufacturing positions available across Ohio. But 62-year-old Herbie Mays, like many of Ohio's unemployed, doesn't have the needed skills.

"If you don't keep up with the times," he said, "you're out of luck."

Read the full story at hosted.ap.org.

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