Perspective: Why we desperately need to bring back vocational training in schools

By Nicholas Wyman, for Forbes

Oct 06, 2016

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Throughout most of U.S. history, American high school students were routinely taught vocational and job-ready skills along with the three Rs: reading, writing and arithmetic. But in the 1950s, a different philosophy emerged: the theory that students should follow separate educational tracks according to ability.

The idea was that the college-bound would take traditional academic courses (Latin, creative writing, science, math) and received no vocational training. Those students not headed for college would take basic academic courses, along with vocational training, or “shop.”

Ability tracking did not sit well with educators or parents, who believed students were assigned to tracks not by aptitude, but by socio-economic status and race. The backlash against tracking, however, did not bring vocational education back to the academic core. Instead, the focus shifted to preparing all students for college, and college prep is still the center of the U.S. high school curriculum.

However, despite the growing evidence that four-year college programs serve fewer and fewer of our students, states continue to cut vocational programs. The demise of vocational education at the high school level has bred a skills shortage in manufacturing today, and with it a wealth of career opportunities for both under-employed college grads and high school students looking for direct pathways to interesting, lucrative careers.

Read the full story.

 

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