Take the first step toward continuing education

Your personal motivations for training and continuing education should guide your efforts.

By Andrew Sloley

The willingness of employers to commit funds for continuing education for their personnel waxes and wanes with the management philosophy in vogue and the availability of funds. When times are good, it's easier to convince the boss to spend money on courses, seminars and conferences; when times are bad, it's harder.

Continuing education takes more than money, of course. It requires you to invest time and make a commitment. This applies to everything from self-study to university courses. Continuing education must provide value for the time spent. An employer only will pay if it can expect some level of return.

Corporate training programs range from non-existent to highly structured. If your company lacks a program, it's completely up to you to decide what you need and how to get it. Even in structured programs, a lot of variation may be available. You always have the final responsibility for improving your skills. Your personal motivations for training and continuing education should guide your efforts.

Read the whole story on Chemical Processing

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